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Lost to an Ancient War - Egyptian Wells Uncovered in North Sinai

The wells are believed to have been built before the reign of Seti I and were part of the Horus Military Road, an ancient route that was used by the ancient Egyptians

Five water wells believed to date back to the 13th century BC have been discovered in the Tell El Kedwa region of North Sinai by an Egyptian archaeological mission.

 

According to the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, the wells are believed to have been built before the reign of Seti I and were part of the Horus Military Road, an ancient route that was used by the ancient Egyptians.

 

The Horus Military Route was used during the old, middle and new kingdoms and has been depicted in inscriptions at Luxor's Karnak Temple. The route was 220 kilometres long and connected Egypt to Palestine.

 

The wells were found just outside of the Tell El Kedwa fortress, one of several strongholds in the area. Four of the five discovered wells were filled with sand to prevent the Persian army - which invaded Egypt in 525 BC - from using them. Inside the fifth well, the mission discovered 13 pottery rings and several clay pots dating back to the 26th dynasty, aka the Saite period.

 

Nearby, another archaeological team discovered a large storage centre dating to the same period, where they found a pile of clay pots and kilns.